A new Roguelike interpretation

by Slash, priest of the Temple of the Roguelike

“What is a roguelike?” is a long standing question with no single answer; there are many perspectives you could apply to understand what “roguelike” refers to, starting from strictly historical ascendance, passing through aesthetics or even focusing on a single feature such as procedural content or permanent death.

For a long time, I have refrained from providing a single definition, and went instead for a way to evaluate the “roguelikeness” of a game. This I did to encourage experimentation outside the bounds of the classics, but the world has changed.

Over the years there has been a resurgence of the term “roguelike”, where it has been applied to games that differ so much from the originals that the term is losing its meaning every time. Rogue-Legacy-Full-Game-2 Having that in mind, I have decided to share my own interpretation of what I call a Classic Roguelike, with the sole intention of preserving the original nature and identity of the genre; this doesn’t mean roguetemple is only intended to cover the development of classic roguelikes; we are equally interested in games that utilize some of the mechanics from roguelikes and complement them with other genres.

The most important perspective for me when considering if a game is a roguelike are its game design features. Note however that my interpretation is not limited to the features of the original “Rogue”, nor am I listing all of its features to be required; this list is derived from my experience over the years on what makes a roguelike, i.e. which features from the good old roguelikes are critical to conserve the spirit of the genre.

So, for a game to be considered a Classic Roguelike by this interpretation, it should comply with ALL of the following features:

  • Turn based: The player interacts in turns; for every turn the player gets to decide what action to take. After he decides the game simulates the turns for the rest of the entities in the game world and them prompts the player back for action. The player can pass its turn but it’s done manually as an explicit action.
  • Grid based: (Which could be implied from being “Turn based”) There is an underlying orthogonal or hexagonal grid where the entities of the world are placed. Movement occurs from one cell to another close cell.
  • Permanent Failure: Encouraging the player to take responsibility for the risks he takes. Games can be persisted to support interrupted play sessions but players cannot reload a game for the sake of experimenting or to “retry” a fight or seek a better outcome on a random event.
  • Procedural environments: Most of the game world is generated by the game for every new gameplay session. This is meant to encourage replayability and complements permanent failure.
  • Random conflict outcomes: The main conflict action between entities in the game (commonly, attacking an enemy or casting a spell) has a random outcome. For example, for most of times you can’t know for certain in advance how many hitpoints your attack will reduce from the enemy (Although the player has a reference range and variability that should allow him to make tactical choices).
  • Inventory: There are items the player can pick up and use and inventory space is limited, the player should decide strategically what items are best to keep to survive and win the game.
  • Single Character: The player is represented by a single character inside the game world.

Use this interpretation at your own risk. Some games could be considered roguelikes and don’t have all these features. You might also want to check other roguelike definitions attempts:

7DRL Challenge 2013 – Evaluation Results

7drlMany moons it has been since the 154 7DRLs were released, but slavering in the background have been an army of 39 reviewers desperately playing these labours of love and scribbling little notes on sheets. After this long process we have finally collated a set of reviews and scores for almost every 7DRL made this year. I present you with our glorious offering:

http://www.roguetemple.com/7drl/2013/

Some notes on using the site:

  • Reviews are subjective and based on personal opinion – take them with a pinch of salt! As a rule of thumb anything with a 2+ is considered good.
  • Click on column heading to re-sort by that value
  • Click on score values to see detailed review/justification information in the bottom pane
  • Some of the game links may be outdated – let us know if you find any errors
  • 75% of games have 3 reviews, and 33% have 2 reviews, 423 reviews total
  • No one was able to get 10bar Roguelike or Random Chance running :(

Special thanks go out to Jo Bradshaw and Xecutor who did 40 and 39 reviews respectively! Also thanks to GameHunter for doing videos of almost every 7DRL – links to specific game videos are next to the reviews.

There are a lot of real gems in here, and a huge amount of variety, showing the roguelike scene is as fresh as vibrant as it has ever been. Do go try some of these great games, and give feedback to the devs after their hard work.

And if by some bizarre miracle you get sick of these 154 games, be sure to catch up on the 7DRLs from 2012, 2011, 2010 and earlier